The Texas Heartbeat Act: Answers to 11 Frequently-Asked Questions
Photo by Enrique Macias on Unsplash

The Texas Heartbeat Act: Answers to 11 Frequently-Asked Questions

After passage of the Texas Heartbeat Act (Senate Bill 8), numerous misinformation campaigns have led to confusion among the general public as to what the legislation covers and how violations are handled.

Comments Off on The Texas Heartbeat Act: Answers to 11 Frequently-Asked Questions

Utah’s Expansion of Prenatal Child Support

On March 16, 2021, Utah Governor Spencer Cox signed House Bill 113 into law. [1] This short legislation greatly expands Utah’s existing prenatal child support requirements by pulling and combining aspects found in other states. Fig 1. House Bill 113 (Utah, 2021) Previously, the Utah Code only contained vague sections under Title 78B relating to non-resident jurisdiction [2] and admissibility of the mother’s prenatal costs to court for reimbursement [3][4] to meet Federal minimum requirements [5]. Fig 2. US Code §666(a)(5)(K) (US, 1996) With the passage of House Bill 113 — effective May 5, 2021 — a father will be expected to equally split prenatal costs with a mother before birth or reimburse an equal split of costs after establishment of paternity. These equally-divided costs include health insurance premiums and direct medical costs during pregnancy from conception until after the hospital stay for childbirth. If the mother has an elective, induced abortion for which the father did not consent (aside from one after rape or incest), he is exempt from any prenatal child support payments. Every US state and territory has some baseline level of prenatal child support requirements [6],…

0 Comments

End of content

No more pages to load